Fressschlacht

by Valle Döring

department
media art

A businesswoman, a businessman and their assistants have lunch in a restaurant. They talk about supposedly social issues: Family, private life. The small talk becomes a side show of the actual takeover negotiations. At the table, the frank word is avoided. Instead, the negotiating partners try to outdo each other in banal topics. In doing so, they spare no effort and sometimes resort to absurd means. On the toilet, however, plain language is spoken. New intrigues are spun in order to avoid being left completely empty after the desperate conclusion of the contract. Despite constantly impressing and playing all the trump cards, none of the parties is superior. The negotiations end desperately in a Shakespearian war of words and mutual poisoning, after which the assistants eat the remains of their former superiors. The artist as a unity of life and profession is currently recognized, further developed and economically perfected as an exploitation model of the meritocracy. Fressschlacht shows that the progressing mixing of profession, private life and self-dramatization has long since become a form of performance. Even if the characters move in the spheres of the business world, the entire society is addressee and victim of this parody.

Closing

Moral Shutdown

Moral Shutdown ends the graduation show in a tumultuous and bizarre critique of capitalist society.

Recorded

Fresschlacht

Valle Döring

A businesswoman, a businessman and their assistants have lunch in a restaurant. They talk about supposedly social issues: Family, private life. The small talk becomes a side show of the actual takeover negotiations. At the table, the frank word is avoided. Instead, the negotiating partners try to outdo each other in banal topics. In doing so, they spare no effort and sometimes resort to absurd means. On the toilet, however, plain language is spoken. New intrigues are spun in order to avoid being left completely empty after the desperate conclusion of the contract. Despite constantly impressing and playing all the trump cards, none of the parties is superior. The negotiations end desperately in a Shakespearian war of words and mutual poisoning, after which the assistants eat the remains of their former superiors. The artist as a unity of life and profession is currently recognized, further developed and economically perfected as an exploitation model of the meritocracy. Fressschlacht shows that the progressing mixing of profession, private life and self-dramatization has long since become a form of performance. Even if the characters move in the spheres of the business world, the entire society is addressee and victim of this parody.